Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Once Upon A Live SXSW Episode

Last week, Jay and I were invited to Austin, Texas to do a live recording of The Extraordinary Negroes on TuneIn's Podcast Stage at SXSW (South By Southwest, an annual music, tech, and film festival).


And here is the episode we recorded.




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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Come check out The Extraordinary Negroes at SXSW in Austin, TX


Oh, hey.

The awesome (and smart) folk at SXSW (a music, film, and tech festival in Austin, TX) are allowing Jay and I to take the stage for a special live broadcast of The Extraordinary Negroes. Chicken and champagne for everyone.


It's our first time going, and I'm hyped to be there in the mix with other creatives and big thinkers and surrounded by an abundance of (allegedly) brilliant BBQ. We shall see. This is our second live event, and expect to have a dope-ass time. If you're heading to SXSW, come check us out on Tuesday, March 14, at 2PM on the SXSW Podcast Stage. And here is a list of all participating podcasts. See you there.

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Monday, March 6, 2017

new writing for Saint Heron and Jet

I've been writing. 


In my most recent joint for my Black In the Day series on Saint Heron, I assembled a collection of goodies to help you get your joy on:
"Life can be wack sometimes, especially when living and working amongst shitbag-electing jive turkeys, rabid Iggy Azalea stans, kitten heel hoarders and such. Contending with chirren, work, honey shortages at Popeye’s, and automobills can drain one’s spirit, so it’s important that we take a break from saving the world to enjoy some soul food, to replenish what institutional hateration depletes. Laughter is a wonderful way to shake off the blues and sooth oneself as The Tangerine Terrorist and his cabinet of gargoyles jump into the fast lane to 1862. Here are a few spirit-lifting moments in Blackness to assist with your laughter-as-self-care situation. May your days be merry and moisturized."
Read "Black In The Day: The Black Joy Playlist" at SaintHeron.com.



In my first for Jet, I gave an update on a Chicago activist who had a rough moment that led him to attempt to end his life:
"Regarding his mental state, Brown insists he simply encountered a rough moment—an uncharacteristic moment of weakness—and that his experience was not a sign of a bigger problem.
“I already know I’m not depressed. I’m not crazy. I’m not even sad anymore,” Brown revealed. “I’m so uplifted and that’s the power of unity. I’m not depressed. I had a very bad day.”
Though he’s reluctant to give a name to his mental and emotional struggles, he’s dedicated to taking steps to improving his wellness. His first step is to seek out a psychiatric evaluation."
Read "Activist Jedidiah Brown Healing After Suicide Attempt" at JetMag.com.

And here is the rest of my writing.

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Episode 16 of The Extraordinary Negroes: "Anatomy Lessons" (feat. Jerrika Hinton)


In this episode, we’re joined by actress Jerrika Hinton of ABC’s Grey's Anatomy. She dishes on what it's like to play Dr. Stephanie Edwards in the house that Shonda built, her experiences as a person of color in the entertainment industry, and what you can expect from this upcoming season of Grey's Anatomy. Additionally, I have a special place in his heart for Harriet Winslow, Jay ain't about that time travel life, and Bobby Brown’s fried chicken is magically delicious.


Get caught up on The Extraordinary Negroes episodes here
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Saturday, January 7, 2017

More writing and such.

So I wrote two pieces for Tonic, VICE's health section. 

The first was on why some people may feel more comfortable with a doctor of the same race or cultural background:
When you're nearly incapacitated from debilitating agony thanks to an infected cyst near your spine, the last person you want diving into your back with a scalpel is a dusty, ice-hearted surgeon. That's exactly who greeted my friend, Sarah (who prefers not to use her last name), when she wound up in an operating room to have the mass removed. Beforehand, all she received was a flat warning that the applied anesthesia gel might not be strong enough. 
It wasn't. Ignoring Sarah's screams, Dr. Apathy resolved with a huff that she couldn't help her if she insisted on crying. She covered Sarah's incision with tape and gauze, and sent her on her way, cyst and all, without pain medication or a referral to another surgeon. Sarah saw another doctor for stitches and pain medication the next day. Turned off by the straight-faced barbarism of the second doctor as well, she received what she describes as humane treatment from a staff of black doctors after she moved back to her Caribbean home 
"The difference was like night and day," she says. 
Read "I'm Black and My Doctor Should Be Too"
The second was on what it's like for men with lupus, a disease that overwhelmingly affects women:
Lupus is especially dastardly because it's an autoimmune disease that causes one's overactive immune system to attack your skin, body, and organs the same way it would normally fight bacteria and viruses. It affects everyone differently, has no cure, and can affect every organ. It's big fun.

Ninety percent of those with the disease are women who typically develop the disease between the ages of 15 and 44. Like disenfranchisement and harassment from racist jerks on the eve of a Trump presidency, lupus affects Black, Latina, Asian, and Native American women significantly more than white women. There is no clear consensus on why, but many experts point to environmental factors over genetic ones.
Read "The Male Faces of Lupus
Also, I wrote a thing about self-care and learning to sit the hell down and relax while out in California recently:
Just now in Denny’s, sitting in the same booth I sat in countless times with homies during my time here as a timid dancer, and fleshed out that memoir outline. It feels real. Doable. And then the title came. And I skeeted in my pants a little. And then I opened the Google Doc with the dusty outline for a book of essays and had a moment of exuberance in that joint right quick. Then I had an eight-second dance party and asked for the check. And the ancestors heel-toed in jubilee.
At home, I hadn’t been able to relax enough to pursue any personal, exploratory writing that wasn’t tied to a check or “work” in any serious way. Here these few days, there’s no endless hustle or slothlike crowds to drive up my pressure. No appointments, packed and musty trains, or rat bastard rheumatologists (who uses mucho omission and a one-sized-fits-all approach to prescribing life-ruining lupus medications) to harass my spirit. I’ve been writing like a motherfucker out here.
And breathing. And eating. 
Read "Self-Care, Clarity, and Sunshine: On Taking My Own Advice"
Also, we're 14 episodes with The Extraordinary Negroes and have a nice squad of contributors forming. Come on over and have a gander. Oh, and subscribe to The Extraordinary Newsletter.

Let's keep the party going: The Extraordinary Negroes |The Colored Boy Store | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Goodreads

Subscribe to The Colored Boy Report, Alexander Hardy's personal newsletter, and receive updates and exclusive content via email.


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